Common Module Cheat Sheet - All Texts

Table of Contents
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Module Description

In this common module students deepen their understanding of how texts represent individual and collective human experiences. They examine how texts represent human qualities and emotions associated with, or arising from, these experiences. Students appreciate, explore, interpret, analyse and evaluate the ways language is used to shape these representations in a range of texts in a variety of forms, modes and media.

Students explore how texts may give insight into the anomalies, paradoxes and inconsistencies in human behaviour and motivations, inviting the responder to see the world differently, to challenge assumptions, ignite new ideas or reflect personally. They may also consider the role of storytelling throughout time to express and reflect particular lives and cultures. By responding to a range of texts they further develop skills and confidence using various literary devices, language concepts, modes and media to formulate a considered response to texts.

Students study one prescribed text and a range of short texts that provide rich opportunities to further explore representations of human experiences illuminated in texts. They make increasingly informed judgements about how aspects of these texts, for example context, purpose, structure, stylistic and grammatical features, and form shape meaning. In addition, students select one related text and draw from personal experience to make connections between themselves, the world of the text and their wider world.

Key Statements

Key Statement What does it mean?
Individual and Collective Human Experiences An individual human experience is exclusive to 1 individual, whereas a collective experience is shared by multiple individuals
Human qualities and emotions associated with, or arising from, these experiences The attributes, characteristics, and feelings connected to/caused by human experiences
Anomalies, Paradoxes, and Inconsistencies Anomalies - Behaviours and motivations outside the norms and conventions of a particular social context
Paradoxes - Behaviours which conflict with the motivations
Inconsistencies: Behaviours and motivations which change despite no apparent cause
To see the world differently, to challenge assumptions, ignite new ideas or reflect personally How the text influences the audience’s way of thinking, whether by exposing them to novel ideas, challenging their pre-existing notions, or reinforcing their beliefs in an unsettling manner.

Dimensions of the Human Experience

The human experiences represented in your prescribed/unseen texts will always be connected to one of the subcategories of the “wellness wheel”:

Words to include in textual analysis

These make markers happy for some reason.

  • Appreciate - when making a judgement about the value of something
  • Explore - when discussing the themes of the text
  • Interpret - when discussing the audience’s interaction with the text
  • Analyse - When discussing your understanding of the text
  • Expression - When discussing the author/poet/artist’s connection to the text
  • Elicit - When discussing how a technique results in an emotion

Plutchik Wheel of Emotions

Essay Length

For paper 1 unseen texts, a good estimate is 2-3 lines per mark, while the extended response should be ~800 words/6 pages. If you don’t hit those numbers, that’s totally fine, it’s just a good estimate.

RESOURCE: CHIPS Question Breakdown Strategy

Body Paragraph Structure

  1. Statement about the concept
  2. What type(s) of experience from the wellness wheel is represented, and is it collective or individual?
  3. What emotions from the Plutkich wheel are present, and how are they used (Example/Technique from PETAL paragraphs)?
  4. How does the experience of the example present anomaly/paradox/inconsistency in the human experience?
  5. What does the composer achieve?
    • Personal reflection? Challenging the reader’s assumptions? Persuading you of something?
  6. Conclude with a mash of steps 1, 2, and 3

Positive and Negative Words

Positive

Acceptance
Adoration
Admiration
Attachment
Belonging
Cherish
Companionship
Connection
Devotion
Dedication
Faith
Forgivemess
Heightened
Inspirational
Intimate
Intense
Passionate
Powerful
Profound
Sincere
Truthful
Uplifting
Vivid
Wholesome

Negative

Anger
Betrayal
Disregarding
Dishonesty
Disrespect
Hatred
Inconsistent
Loss
Sacrifice

Words to describe the human experience that mean nothing but for some reason get more marks

Contradictory
Complex
MULTIFACETED (markers love this one)
Paradoxical
Inexplicable
Inevitable
Confronting
Empowering
Transformative
Debilitating

Targets of a text

A text targets… If it appeals to…
Pathos Emotions/Morals/Values
Ethos Trust/Credibility
Logos Logic/Reason

Tone Words

Accusatory
Admiring
Aggressive
Arrogant
Assertive
Authoritative
Awestruck
Benevolent
Bitter
Colloquial (casual)
Compassionate
Curious
Critical
Cynical
Demeaning
Didactic (instructional)
Diplomatic
Empathetic
Enthusiastic
Flippant (disrespectful)
Humourous
Incredulous (disbelief)
Indignant (annoyed)
Judgemental
Narcissistic
Nostalgic
Objective
Optimistic
Outspoken
Patronising (like a Karen)
Pragmatic (negatively realistic)
Regretful
Satirical
Scornful
Sentimental
Sincere
Sympathetic
Thoughtful
Tolerant
Uneasy
Vindictive (bitter)
Whimsical (playful/childish)

Punchy Phrases

  • Aids in this improved understanding of the textual material
  • Indicates the universality in the subject matter being contemplated
  • Brings reader to consider more deeply the manner in which ___
  • An intimacy is generated between the viewer and ___
  • Creates a more nuanced understanding
  • Attracting to the audience to both ___
  • To further impress upon the reader the idea of ___
  • Further clarify and cement reader’s understand of the literal content
  • Further elucidates the impression that

Free Thesis Statements

  • Texts represent how human experiences are dependent on one’s context and their ability to transcend the limitations of context
  • Texts about human experience invite the audience to contemplate on their own experiences and reflect on the processes that shape their identity
  • Human experiences may be recursive but they are transformative nonetheless
  • Texts offer a representations of human experience that challenges our assumptions and thus intensifies our awareness of self and others
  • Representation of relationships in texts highlight the way in which human experiences may differ in varied interactions
  • Texts offer a representation of the human experience to record the social and emotional development of the individual and the collective
  • Our experiences expose our capacity for fortitude and focus, particularly when our individual ideals are challenged by contextual values / societal expectations
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